Deserts of vast eternity

Or wilt thou go ask the Mole?
fakescience:

Happy OMg Day (8/12)!
Celebrate with Fake Science 101 or, if you prefer, quiet contemplation.

fakescience:

Happy OMg Day (8/12)!

Celebrate with Fake Science 101 or, if you prefer, quiet contemplation.

theraccolta:

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

theraccolta:

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

(Source: 03varvara.wordpress.com, via johnthelutheran)

In which I become unusually angry

thatlittleegyptologist:

I won’t reblog the post this came from since OP didn’t actually translate these glyphs (it’s a scan from a book)
That being said, holy shit is this a bad translation. 
The transliteration makes zero sense. I’m not even sure what school they’re using, but it’s pretty bad. 
It should read: ink pr imn imy-ib Hr-ib imy Xt anx=i m Dd=i (or written like it would be pronounced: i-nekh per imun i-mi-ib her-ib i-mi het ankh-i em djed-i) 
Actual translation: “I am the one who comes forth as Amun, favoured one, within the midst of the (?). I live through my speech.” 
imy doesn’t even mean “pure” w’b (wab) does. I’m not even sure what two prepositions (Hr-ib and imy) are doing together since both mean “in the middle of” and Xt doesn’t mean body and it doesn’t have the correct determinative for it either. H’w (how) is the closest approximation. Looking up “kshat” you get “unanointed one” 
In conclusion: Egyptologist says what? 

Think it’s Budge. I recognise the glyphs, I think, and the style, including the pseudo-phonetic translit.
I think the phrase Hr-ib imi Xt is probably something like “in the midst of what is in the belly”, at first glance. Don’t recognise this text, but it sounds funerary.A quick flick through my copy of Faulkner’s translation of the BD didn’t turn up anything, and neither did Google, though that doesn’t mean anything, of course.
Still, my best guess is that it’s from Budge’s publication of the Book of the Dead.

thatlittleegyptologist:

I won’t reblog the post this came from since OP didn’t actually translate these glyphs (it’s a scan from a book)

That being said, holy shit is this a bad translation. 

The transliteration makes zero sense. I’m not even sure what school they’re using, but it’s pretty bad. 

It should read: ink pr imn imy-ib Hr-ib imy Xt anx=i m Dd=i (or written like it would be pronounced: i-nekh per imun i-mi-ib her-ib i-mi het ankh-i em djed-i) 

Actual translation: “I am the one who comes forth as Amun, favoured one, within the midst of the (?). I live through my speech.” 

imy doesn’t even mean “pure” w’b (wab) does. I’m not even sure what two prepositions (Hr-ib and imy) are doing together since both mean “in the middle of” and Xt doesn’t mean body and it doesn’t have the correct determinative for it either. H’w (how) is the closest approximation. Looking up “kshat” you get “unanointed one” 

In conclusion: Egyptologist says what? 

Think it’s Budge. I recognise the glyphs, I think, and the style, including the pseudo-phonetic translit.

I think the phrase Hr-ib imi Xt is probably something like “in the midst of what is in the belly”, at first glance. Don’t recognise this text, but it sounds funerary.A quick flick through my copy of Faulkner’s translation of the BD didn’t turn up anything, and neither did Google, though that doesn’t mean anything, of course.

Still, my best guess is that it’s from Budge’s publication of the Book of the Dead.

dreamymoonlove:

"By accident most strange, bountiful Fortune
(now my dear lady) hath mine enemies
Brought to this shore. And by my prescience
I find my zenith doth depend upon
A most auspicious star, whose influence
If now I court not but omit, my fortunes
Will ever after droop.” - Prospero
Act I, Scene II 
The Tempest, 1908. 
by William Shakespeare. 
illustrated by Edmund Dulac. 

dreamymoonlove:

"By accident most strange, bountiful Fortune

(now my dear lady) hath mine enemies

Brought to this shore. And by my prescience

I find my zenith doth depend upon

A most auspicious star, whose influence

If now I court not but omit, my fortunes

Will ever after droop.” - Prospero

Act I, Scene II 

The Tempest, 1908. 

by William Shakespeare. 

illustrated by Edmund Dulac. 

(Source: starswaterairdirt)

The damned are faceless or have faces that are mutilated and atrocious, but they think of themselves as beautiful. The exercise of power and mutual hatred is their happiness. They devote their lives to politics, in the most South American sense of the word: that is, they live to scheme, to lie, and to impose their will on others.

Jorge Luis Borges, on Emanuel Swedenborg’s Mystical Works (via speakmnemosyne)

(via get-thee-to-a-library)

(Source: isabellamuradas)

Mendelssohn, Lieder ohne worte, op. 19 no.1, played by Barenboim.

beardedkomedy:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

I feel like this could be my secondary icon.

Tea is good too :)

beardedkomedy:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

I feel like this could be my secondary icon.

Tea is good too :)

(Source: lee-enfeel, via thatlittleegyptologist)