Deserts of vast eternity

Or wilt thou go ask the Mole?
thatlittleegyptologist:

I won’t reblog the post this came from since OP didn’t actually translate these glyphs (it’s a scan from a book)
That being said, holy shit is this a bad translation. 
The transliteration makes zero sense. I’m not even sure what school they’re using, but it’s pretty bad. 
It should read: ink pr imn imy-ib Hr-ib imy Xt anx=i m Dd=i (or written like it would be pronounced: i-nekh per imun i-mi-ib her-ib i-mi het ankh-i em djed-i) 
Actual translation: “I am the one who comes forth as Amun, favoured one, within the midst of the (?). I live through my speech.” 
imy doesn’t even mean “pure” w’b (wab) does. I’m not even sure what two prepositions (Hr-ib and imy) are doing together since both mean “in the middle of” and Xt doesn’t mean body and it doesn’t have the correct determinative for it either. H’w (how) is the closest approximation. Looking up “kshat” you get “unanointed one” 
In conclusion: Egyptologist says what? 

Think it’s Budge. I recognise the glyphs, I think, and the style, including the pseudo-phonetic translit.
I think the phrase Hr-ib imi Xt is probably something like “in the midst of what is in the belly”, at first glance. Don’t recognise this text, but it sounds funerary.A quick flick through my copy of Faulkner’s translation of the BD didn’t turn up anything, and neither did Google, though that doesn’t mean anything, of course.
Still, my best guess is that it’s from Budge’s publication of the Book of the Dead.

thatlittleegyptologist:

I won’t reblog the post this came from since OP didn’t actually translate these glyphs (it’s a scan from a book)

That being said, holy shit is this a bad translation. 

The transliteration makes zero sense. I’m not even sure what school they’re using, but it’s pretty bad. 

It should read: ink pr imn imy-ib Hr-ib imy Xt anx=i m Dd=i (or written like it would be pronounced: i-nekh per imun i-mi-ib her-ib i-mi het ankh-i em djed-i) 

Actual translation: “I am the one who comes forth as Amun, favoured one, within the midst of the (?). I live through my speech.” 

imy doesn’t even mean “pure” w’b (wab) does. I’m not even sure what two prepositions (Hr-ib and imy) are doing together since both mean “in the middle of” and Xt doesn’t mean body and it doesn’t have the correct determinative for it either. H’w (how) is the closest approximation. Looking up “kshat” you get “unanointed one” 

In conclusion: Egyptologist says what? 

Think it’s Budge. I recognise the glyphs, I think, and the style, including the pseudo-phonetic translit.

I think the phrase Hr-ib imi Xt is probably something like “in the midst of what is in the belly”, at first glance. Don’t recognise this text, but it sounds funerary.A quick flick through my copy of Faulkner’s translation of the BD didn’t turn up anything, and neither did Google, though that doesn’t mean anything, of course.

Still, my best guess is that it’s from Budge’s publication of the Book of the Dead.

dreamymoonlove:

"By accident most strange, bountiful Fortune
(now my dear lady) hath mine enemies
Brought to this shore. And by my prescience
I find my zenith doth depend upon
A most auspicious star, whose influence
If now I court not but omit, my fortunes
Will ever after droop.” - Prospero
Act I, Scene II 
The Tempest, 1908. 
by William Shakespeare. 
illustrated by Edmund Dulac. 

dreamymoonlove:

"By accident most strange, bountiful Fortune

(now my dear lady) hath mine enemies

Brought to this shore. And by my prescience

I find my zenith doth depend upon

A most auspicious star, whose influence

If now I court not but omit, my fortunes

Will ever after droop.” - Prospero

Act I, Scene II 

The Tempest, 1908. 

by William Shakespeare. 

illustrated by Edmund Dulac. 

(Source: starswaterairdirt)

The damned are faceless or have faces that are mutilated and atrocious, but they think of themselves as beautiful. The exercise of power and mutual hatred is their happiness. They devote their lives to politics, in the most South American sense of the word: that is, they live to scheme, to lie, and to impose their will on others.

Jorge Luis Borges, on Emanuel Swedenborg’s Mystical Works (via speakmnemosyne)

(Source: spokemnemosyne, via get-thee-to-a-library)

(Source: isabellamuradas)

Mendelssohn, Lieder ohne worte, op. 19 no.1, played by Barenboim.

beardedkomedy:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

I feel like this could be my secondary icon.

Tea is good too :)

beardedkomedy:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

I feel like this could be my secondary icon.

Tea is good too :)

(Source: lee-enfeel, via thatlittleegyptologist)

woahgnarlyduuuude:

i’m procrastinating because i’m stressed and i’m stressed because i’m procrastinating

image

(via thatlittleegyptologist)

adaltaredei:

altarandhour:

besturlonhere:

themarsultor:

behold-my-procrastination:

voyagebysexualdiscovery:

Uh oh

uh oh

If this is true, I’m going to die laughing.

there’s bazillions of non-canonical gospels that all have zany things in them this isn’t……………what you think it is probably?

Breaking: Tumblr Literally Shocked to Learn that Gnosticism Was a Thing, Thinks Church Didn’t Know This

This was taught by some Islamic scholars… Not exactly shocking to hear a book that says it. I’m sure the Vatican is totally in awe 😂

1. The news is at least two years old: http://www.todayszaman.com/news-272334-1500-year-old-handwritten-bible-kept-in-ankara-ministry-confirms.html

2. The earlier story says the book was found in an unknown location and seized by the Turkish authorities, but that they are certain it’s genuine.It therefore has no clear archaeological context, but it’s being claimed to be genuine, and given a dating without an open scholarly investigation. This here is what we in the profession call “bullshit”.

3. Those biblical scholars who have taken a look at it are pretty well certain it’s a fake: http://www.timothymichaellaw.com/not-a-1500-year-old-bible-in-turkey/

4. Tehram isn’t a place. Tehran is, and is the capital of Iran. Their relevance to a book found in Turkey is dubious at best. Their relevance to a supposed Christian gospel found in Turkey is highly dubious.

6. The Gospel of Barnabas is a well-known medieval or early modern pseudepigraphical work. It is otherwise known from two manuscripts, one in Spanish, one in Italian. It can be found in English translation (first published 1907) here: http://sacred-texts.com/isl/gbar/index.htm ; it has a wikipedia page here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Barnabas . The section entitled “possible Syriac manuscripts” contains another scholarly opinion that this book is a fake, and does not even contain the Gospel of Barnabas.

7. Apocryphal gospels are nothing new, exciting, or challenging. The 18th century ended a long time ago: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocryphal_Gospel .

So, tumblr, 10/10 for gullibility, but minus several zillion for intellect, knowledge, and gumption. Well done, you fell for the hype.

Edited to add:

8. A couple of people further down the thread have already linked to the La Stampa article on this: http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/world-news/detail/articolo/bibbia-bible-biblia-13182/ , and also to a debunking based on the Italian and Spanish manuscripts: http://www.apologia.50megs.com/Gospel%20of%20Barnabas.html , which points to some reasons to say that the Gospel of Barnabas is a late medieval work.

9. Believe what you will, but abusing your own intellect with lazy, smug approaches to sensationalist news stories which confirm your preferred set of beliefs is not rational, sensible, or justifiable. In the end, it is to betray yourself by allowing yourself to be misled. Follow the truth wherever it leads you, but stuff like this is an insult to your own intellect, first and foremost.

Lamentations of Jeremiah the Prophet I (Aleph-Beth). Thomas Tallis (1505-1585).

Incipit lamentatio Ieremiae prophetae:

Aleph. Quomodo sedet sola civitas, plena populo!
Facta est quasi vidua domina gentium,
et princeps provinciarum facta est sub tributo.


Beth. Plorans ploravit in nocte, et lacrimae eius in maxillis eius;
non est qui consoletur eam ex omnibus caris eius:
omnes amici eius spreverunt eam et facti sunt ei inimici.


Ierusalem, Ierusalem, convertere ad Dominum Deum tuum.

"The beginning of the Lamentations of Jeremiah the Prophet:
Aleph. How lonely the city sits, once full of people!
The queen of nations has been made as a widow,
and the prince of provinces as a vassal.

Beth. Weeping has she wept in the night, and her tears are on her cheeks;
there is none to console her, from all her lovers:
all her friends have spurned her and become her enemies.

Jerusalem, Jerusalem: return  to the Lord your God.”

The Book of Lamentations consists of a series of acrostic prayers, each stanza beginning with a successive letter of the Hebrew alphabet. It is ascribed to the prophet Jeremiah, and is supposed to have been written after the destruction of Jerusalem. Extracts from it are traditionally recited or sung at the divine office on Maundy Thursday and Good Friday.

Tallis was the composer for the Chapel Royal under Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary, and Elizabeth I. He remained a Catholic throughout this period, perhaps afforded some protection by his position. He was also one of only a few composers in Elizabethan England to continue to compose religious music in Latin. Along with the other English Catholic composer of the time William Byrd, he was granted a 21-year monopoly on composing polyphonic music by Elizabeth I in 1575.

Judas, mercator pessimus. Tomas Luis da Victoria (c. 1548-1611); Officium Hebdomadae Sanctae (1585).

Iudas mercator pessimus osculo petiit Dominum
ille ut agnus innocens non negavit Iudae osculum.
Denariorum numero Christum Iudaeis tradidit.
Melius illi erat si natus non fuisset.

"Judas, that vilest merchant, sought a kiss from the Lord,
and he, as an innocent lamb, did not deny Judas the kiss.
For many denarii he handed Jesus over to the Jews;
It would have been better for him that he had not been born.”

Today is traditionally called Spy Wednesday, in reference to the idea that today, two days before Good Friday, commemorates the day on which Judas Iscariot went to the Sanhedrin and agreed to betray Jesus.

This piece of music was really written for the morning liturgical service (Office) tomorrow. A reponsory follows the recitation of a psalm, as a short reflection. Traditionally, the morning and evening offices were combined into a single service held after dark, called tenebrae (lit. “darkness”), at which a series of candles was extinguished after each psalm, symbolising the gloom and sorrow of the Crucifixion. At the end of the service, a single candle, still lit, is hidden beneath the altar, symbolising the hope of the Resurrection.

This setting of the text was written by one of the last - and greatest - composers of the Renaissance, Tomas Luis da Victoria, a Spanish Catholic priest. It comes from his setting of the whole office (liturgy of reciting the psalms at set hours of the day) for Holy Week, completed in 1585.